Based at Feel Good Balham: 020 8673 2163

  • Mondays: 13:30 - 21:30

Neil is a GoSC registered osteopath, sports massage therapist and fellow of Applied Functional Science, with extensive clinical experience. Neil has also trained with the British Medical Acupuncture Society and often uses western medical acupuncture during treatment. Neil has studied with the world leading Gray Institute in the USA, attaining a GIFT fellowship in Applied Functional Science, and is passionate about the power of functional movement to alleviate pain and enhance performance. Neil has been working in Balham for 4 years. Neil has recently moved to Surrey and commutes to Balham once a week to see patients.

The sports massage blog


Pain without injury and injury without pain – what’s going on?

January 11, 2018

Pain can be present both in the presence and in the absence of damage. This is an important concept for both patients and practitioners to understand.

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Sharing the load: Why Roger Federer doesn’t get tennis elbow.

June 28, 2017

When you first start to learn about the body, the information can be overwhelming. What’s where, how it works, why it goes wrong…? You find yourself looking for principles to thread together the pieces of the puzzle. Often, however, you struggle to find clarity amongst all the detail. There is one principle, however, that has […]

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Using your big bits: how the glutes really fire

June 21, 2017

There’s an obvious giveaway about the importance of the gluteal muscles in our bottoms; they are very big! If we have developed a big, powerful set of muscles somewhere on our bodies, then you can be fairly sure that, through our evolution, there has been a necessity for power and strength in that area. I’m […]

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Why your lower back and your tight hip flexors are not the best of friends

March 5, 2017

You soon learn as an osteopath that every body is different and unique. No two postures, movements or conditions are the same from one person to another. That being said, however, there are certain things that you become very used to seeing; tight hip flexors being a prime example. We are a nation of sitters […]

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Sprained ankle on the tennis court? Think TWICE before grabbing the ICE.

April 29, 2015

If you sprain your ankle on the tennis court, the first port of call is usually the clubhouse freezer. But is ice actually doing you more harm than good?

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The Multifidus – maybe the most important muscle you’ve never heard of.

January 30, 2015

When I mention the Multifidus muscle to my patients, I’m often met with quite a puzzled look. If you asked your average person on the street to name 10 muscles in the body, it’s safe to say that the Multifidus would be notable by its absence; very few have heard of it. Don’t be fooled […]

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The rise and fall of the shoulder.

January 30, 2015

Did it draw the evolutionary short straw? I think we can agree that the evolutionary development of human bipedalism (walking on 2 feet!) has generally been a success, right? There are, however, a couple of structures in the human body that seem rather retro-fitted to our new upright postures. Sacrifices that must have been deemed […]

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Disc Herniation: Surgery vs. Mother Nature – The Stats

October 1, 2014

For those people suffering with disc herniations, the decision regarding surgery versus no surgery is often a very difficult and confusing one. Spinal surgeons will argue that surgery is the way to go, while osteopaths and physios may suggest otherwise. In this blog I will objectively outline some of the stats relevant to this topic in an attempt to help both those wrestling with the decision and practitioners who may want more information in order to appropriately advise patients.

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Easy, effective daily back stretching routine

January 8, 2014

Click to view: Back stretching routine_BSM_2014 Each day as we sit at our desks and stand in the lunch queue, we are putting compressive force through our lower backs and the cushioning discs that sit between our vertebrae. Although common sense may suggest that sitting is less of a rigour than standing; in actuality, far more […]

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The Shoulder Pain Series – Part 2

September 10, 2013

Frozen Shoulder – what, why and how?   Frozen shoulder is a puzzling and often misused diagnosis. There are a variety of injuries that can lead to reduced shoulder movement and it’s worth noting that the term “frozen shoulder” isn’t a catch-all term for such injuries, as sometimes assumed by patients. Frozen shoulder refers to […]

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